Thursday, May 5, 2016

Just “Baby Blues” or a Dangerous Time for Mom? Film, special guests tell real-life stories of women, families, and mental illness

What: Screening of Dark Side of the Full Moon, a documentary chronicling real stories of postpartum depression (PPD) and psychosis.

Why: To show the true, sometimes deadly impact of maternal mental health conditions and the need for support for women and families.
  
Who: Presented by the Utah Maternal Mental Health Collaborative. Speakers include:
  • Women who have experienced postpartum depression
  • Experts in the treatment of maternal depression, anxiety, and postpartum psychosis
  • Dr. William Cosgrove, President, Utah Chapter American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Julie Frenette, Certified Nurse Midwife
  • Conference organizer and therapist Amy-Rose White
When: Friday, May 6, 5:30 – 9:00 p.m. (includes post-screening discussion)

Where: Intermountain Medical Center, Doty Education Building #6
5121 S. Cottonwood St., Murray, UT 84107

Media note: The screening begins at 6:00 p.m. Interviewees will be available beginning at 5:30 and again after the screening at 7:30. See the movie trailer at http://www.darksideofthefullmoon.com/home-1-1/.

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Media contact:
Cyndi Bemis
MotherToBaby Pregnancy Risk Line
(o) 801-538-6924
(m) 801-550-4228 
cbemis@utah.gov

Just “Baby Blues” or a Dangerous Time for Mom?


What: Screening of Dark Side of the Full Moon, a documentary chronicling real stories of postpartum depression (PPD) and psychosis.

Why:  To show the true, sometimes deadly impact of maternal mental health conditions and the need for support for women and families. 
   
Who: Presented by the Utah Maternal Mental Health Collaborative. Speakers include:
    • Women who have experienced postpartum depression
    • Experts in the treatment of maternal depression, anxiety, and postpartum psychosis
    • Dr. William Cosgrove, President, Utah Chapter American Academy of Pediatrics
    • Julie Frenette, Certified Nurse Midwife
    • Conference organizer and therapist Amy-Rose White 
When:  Friday, May 6, 5:30 – 9:00 p.m. (includes post-screening discussion)

Where: Intermountain Medical Center, Doty Education Building #6 
                5121 S. Cottonwood St., Murray, UT 84107

-End-

Media note: The screening begins at 6:00 p.m. Interviewees will be available beginning at 5:30 and again after the screening at 7:30. See the movie trailer at http://www.darksideofthefullmoon.com/home-1-1/. 


Media Contact:
Cyndi Bemis
MotherToBaby/Pregnancy Risk Line
(o) 801-538-6924
(m) 801-550-4228
cbemis@utah.gov



Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Schools Encourage Students to Bike to School Safely

(Salt Lake City) – As the weather warms up, many school-age children will begin walking or riding a bicycle to school and the Utah Department of Health (UDOH), Safe Kids Utah, and local elementary schools want to remind parents and kids of the importance of getting to school safe. 

Approximately 600 students, parents, teachers, and community leaders from Silver Mesa Elementary School in Sandy, Utah will walk or ride a bike to school as part of National Bike to School Day on May 4, 2016.

“We are excited to partner with our local schools to create safer routes for bicycling and walking to and from school,” said Cambree Applegate, Safe Kids Utah Director at the UDOH. “Riding a bike is a great way for kids and their families to increase their physical activity and reduce traffic congestion and emissions from vehicles. And learning how to stay safe while doing so is key.” 

According to the Utah Department of Public Safety, there is an average of 764 bicyclists in crashes every year in Utah, an increase of 6.3% over the last 10 years. Nearly 35% of these crashes are school-age children aged 5-19. The summer months, June through September, have the highest bicycle-motor vehicle crashes.

“The most important thing parents and kids can do to stay safe while riding a bicycle is to wear a helmet. In Utah, only 30% of bicyclists in crashes were wearing a helmet and research shows that helmets are the single most effective way to reduce head injuries and deaths in a bicycle crash,” said Applegate.
   
Tips for staying safe while riding a bicycle include:

  • Wear a helmet. Remember, “Use your head, wear a helmet” when riding a bicycle, scooter, skateboard or long board, and when roller skating or in-line skating.
  • Find the right helmet fit and make sure your child knows how to put it on correctly. A helmet should sit on top of the head in a level position and should not rock forward, backward, or side-to-side. The straps must always be buckled and in the form of a “V” under the ears when buckled. A quick helmet fit test can be found at http://www.safekids.org/safetytips/field_type/video.
  • Obey the rules of the road. Teach kids to make eye contact with drivers; use the right side of the road going with traffic not against traffic; how to use hand signals and respect traffic signals, including stopping at all stop signs and stoplights; and to stop and look left, right, and then left again before crossing the street.
  • Maintain equipment and make sure your bike is the right fit.
  • Be bright and be seen. When riding at dawn or dusk, it’s important to be seen. Wearing bright colors and making sure your bike has reflectors or lights make it easier for drivers to see you.
National Bike to School Day provides an opportunity for communities to join together to bicycle to school on the same day. The event builds on the success of the worldwide Walk to School Day event held in October each year.
   
For more information on how to get involved with National Walk and Bike to School Day, visit www.walkbiketoschool.org. Information on creating a safe route to school can be found at www.saferoutesinfo.org. Bicycle and pedestrian safety tips can be found at http://health.utah.gov/vipp.
   
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Media Contacts:
Cambree Applegate
Safe Kids Utah
(o) 801-538-6852 (m) 435-862-8773
capplegate@utah.gov

Katie McMinn
(o) 801-538-6156 (m) 801-856-6697
kmcminn@utah.gov

Monday, May 2, 2016

Medically Complex Children’s Waiver Opens Enrollment: Medicaid Program Now Accepting Applications for 75 New Participants


What: The Utah Department of Health’s Medically Complex Children’s Waiver will open enrollment today and accept applications until Monday, June 6. This program is intended to serve children with disabilities and complex medical conditions, providing them access to respite services, as well as traditional Medicaid services.  

Why: During the 2016 General Legislative Session, the waiver was appropriated an additional $1 million to be spent over the next two years. The new funding will provide services to an additional 75 new applicants. Children currently participating in the program will not need to re-apply. 


Who:
In order to qualify for this program, a child must:

  • Be age 0-18
  • Have three or more specialty physicians
  • Have three or more organ systems involvement
  • Demonstrate a level of medical complexity based on a combination of need for device-based supports, high utilization of medical therapies, and treatments and frequent need for medical intervention
  • Have a disability determined by the State Medical Review Board 
When: The program will accept applications from May 2 through June 6. Applicants will not be selected on a first-come-first-served basis. Once the application period ends, if more applications are received than spots available, UDOH clinical staff will review the applications and base entrance into the program on the highest medical complexity and critical needs of the family, as identified through the application process.
   
Where: Apply online at www.health.utah.gov/ltc/mccw or print an application and submit by fax (801-323-1593) or by mail (UDOH, Medically Complex Children’s Waiver, DMHF, PO Box 143112, Salt Lake City, UT 84114). To be considered for the program, applications must be received or post-marked on or before Monday, June 6.

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Media Contact:
Kolbi Young
Public Information Specialist
801-538-6847 / 801-231-6350
kolbiyoung@utah.gov 

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Remains High Among Utah Healthcare Workers

(Salt Lake City, UT) – The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) released the annual Healthcare Worker (HCW) Influenza Vaccination Coverage Report for HCWs in licensed* Utah hospitals. The report shows healthcare worker coverage rates have increased, from 75.5 percent in 2008 to 95.7 percent in 2016. 

The report lists all reporting licensed Utah hospitals, along with their influenza vaccination rates for hospital HCWs, for the 2015-2016 influenza season. It is available on the UDOH Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) website at http://health.utah.gov/epi/diseases/HAI/HCW_flu/2015-2016_HCW_Influenza_Rpt.pdf.

“Influenza is a serious infection, and unvaccinated healthcare workers who become infected can put patients at risk for serious complications,” said Karen Singson, HAI Program Manager, UDOH.

The UDOH and the Utah Healthcare Infection Prevention Governance Committee (UHIP GC) recognize that influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel is a critical patient safety practice. Both agree that mandatory influenza vaccination for HCWs should be implemented in all healthcare facilities unless a healthcare facility has achieved a vaccination rate of 95 percent or greater by some other means.

In November 2007, the UDOH adopted a Healthcare Associated Infections reporting rule (Rule‐386‐705, Epidemiology, Healthcare Associated Infection). This rule requires that hospitals report healthcare worker influenza vaccination rates.

This report was developed by the UDOH in partnership with the UHIP GC. It will allow Utahns to compare influenza vaccination rates for healthcare workers among licensed hospitals in Utah.

In April 2011, the UHIP GC recommended that all healthcare delivery facilities in Utah implement a policy of compulsory annual influenza vaccination for all healthcare personnel. While Utah hospitals are not required to have mandatory influenza vaccination programs for healthcare workers, 85 percent of Utah healthcare facilities that reported have compulsory programs in place; and of those, 91 percent have HCW influenza vaccination rates of 90 percent or greater. “It is clear that facilities that implement compulsory influenza vaccination policies for employees have higher HCW influenza vaccination rates than those who do not,” said Singson. Healthcare organizations that do not have an effective HCW influenza vaccination policy are strongly encouraged to develop one.

Visit http://health.utah.gov/epi/diseases/HAI/UHIP/ for more information about UHIP GC members.

*Licensed hospitals include acute care, long-term acute care, critical access, rehabilitation, psychiatric, government and children’s hospitals.

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Media Contact:
Charla Haley
(o) 801-273-4178
(c) 801-230-5927
chaley@utah.gov